Irish American Writers & Artists

May 27, 2016

IAW&A Salon at Glucksman Ireland House with Salon Eire 100 – May 24, 2016

Filed under: Uncategorized — by scripts2013 @ 6:14 pm

Photos by Cat Dwyer

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Salon Eire 100 Producer Alison McKenna

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Host and curator of the evening, John Kearns

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Memoirist Colin Broderick

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Artist Geraldine O’Sullivan

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Novelist Tom Phelan

Poet and accordionist, Marni Rice

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Irish Tenor Karl Scully

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Comedian Sarah Fearon

David Beck at Oscar Wilde, Jack Di Monte as William Shakespeare, and Gary Greg as Ernest Hemingway in John Kearns’s “The Importance of Loving Shakespeare”

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Novelist Kathleen Donohoe with her forthcoming novel, Ashes of Fiery Weather

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Renowned alto sax player and memoirist, Jon Gordon

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Singer Mary Deady

 

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John Kearns, Marni Rice, Jon Gordon, Gary Gregg, Jack Di Monte, Karl Scully, Tom Phelan, David Beck, Sarah Fearon, Kathleen Donohoe, Mary Deady, Alison McKenna

 

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IAW&A Salon 5.17.16: Walsh sisters co-host “a marvelous night” of plays, performances, music, even Christmas in May.

Filed under: Uncategorized — by kdaly321 @ 5:12 pm

By Karen Daly
Photos by Cat Dwyer hosts

Cohosts Kathleen Walsh D’Arcy and Maureen Walsh Hossbacher

Kathleen Walsh D’Arcy and Maureen Walsh Hossbacher used their considerable skills in organizing, writing, performing, and connecting to co-host our mid-May IAW&A Salon at the Cell Theatre. The result, in the words of poet Connie Roberts “…a marvelous night…with a fabulous line-up.” That line-up had new musical talent, video, poetry, theater, fiction, and fun.

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Derek Murphy

The program opened with a scene from Dublin-born playwright Derek Murphy’s, Dyin’ For It, a darkly funny work about “extremely inappropriate grieving by the dying Wally Kelly’s wife and daughter.” Superbly acted by Kimberly Kelly Adams, Anna Colson Nugent and Karin de la Penha, the scene was directed by Joe Handel.

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Anna Colson Nugent, Karin de la Penha, and Kimberly Kelly Adams

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Connie Roberts

Award-winning poet from County Offaly and Hofstra University creative writing professor, Connie Roberts read from Little Witness, a collection of poetry inspired by her experiences growing up in an industrial school/orphanage in the Irish midlands. The poems included  “Oasis,” an homage to her 85-year-old foster mother and “Little Witness,” a punch-packing six-line poem about child abuse. Connie’s “The ‘Boys’ in the Bunkhouse” was inspired by fellow IAW&A member Dan Barry’s 2014 investigative piece in The New York Times and now a book of the same title “about a few dozen men from Texas with intellectual disabilities who worked in servitude for decades in a turkey processing plant in Iowa.” “Inheritance” is about the 1943 Poor Clare orphanage fire in Cavan town, in which 35 girls and one old woman perished. The poem ends with the litany of their names, including “the 13 Marys.” Buried in eight coffins with no gravestone or memorial, the haunting verse finally gives them the commemoration they deserved. This summer Connie will receive the Exceptional Offaly Person of the Year 2016 Award at the Tullamore Show. Visit https://connierobertspoet.com.

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David O’Leary

David O’Leary, a young operatic tenor from County Wexford, has sung for President Bill Clinton and for President of Ireland Mary McAleese and now he can add the IAW&A Salon to his resume. David trained with the Irish soprano Deirdre Masterson and has won prizes at major classical competitions in Dublin, Wicklow, and Sligo. He has performed on many concert stages and venues in New York and Ireland. He charmed us at his first IAW&A Salon with the Irish folk song “She Moved Through the Fair.”

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Gordon Gilbert

Playwright, poet, and songwriter Gordon Gilbert has been presenting portions of his play Monologues from the Old Folks Home at earlier IAW&A Salons. Tonight he read segments from three monologues and announced a full performance on Friday, June 24 at the Cornelia Street Café. Gordon regularly hosts spoken word events there. So plan to come out and support him: http://www.corneliastreetcafe.com/restaurant.html

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Kathleen O’Sullivan

Kathleen O’Sullivan is creating a charming multi-media memoir Isham Street about growing up in the Inwood section of upper Manhattan. Tonight she showed a video introduction to that work, called,“From Ireland to Isham Street” that introduces her family in their ancestral home in Rossdohan Island and describes her parents’ coming to America, settling in New York. They found, in the parks and rivers near Inwood, a place that reminded them a bit of Ireland.

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Leah Rankin

IAW&A Salon newcomer Leah Rankin studied classical cello performance at the Eastman School of Music and brilliantly combines classical music with trad tunes. One set used the opening phrase of a cello concerto and went into a jig called, “The Silver Hand.” She also played the Scottish March, “First Light,” a version of the reel “Killarney Boys of Pleasure” and “Catharsis” by Natalie MacMaster. Active on the New York trad scene, Leah runs an open session with Don Meade and Tom Dunne every Friday from 9 pm-12 am at the Long Hall pub 58 East 34th Street, near Park Avenue. Everyone is welcome.

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IAW&A Salon Producer John Kearns made some announcements about upcoming events and gave out chocolate from Barcelona.

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Mark William Butler

A playwright, producer, songwriter, and IAW&A Board member, Mark William Butler was thrilled to present Kaitlyn Baldwin and John Skocik, two great performers who sang Mark’s song, “I’ll Wear Myself,” from his musical comedy in development, Ugly Christmas Sweater, The Musical. The show had very successful concert readings on May 21st and May 23rd at the legendary cabaret theater Don’t Tell Mama on W. 46th Street:  http://www.donttellmamanyc.com/shows. Adds Mark “It’s time to get ugly for Christmas!”

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John Skocik and Kaitlyn Baldwin

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Rosina Fernhoff

Rosina Fernhoff is an accomplished actor known for her solo performances at theatrical venues across the country, especially of works written by her late husband Av Inlender. She studied acting with Lee Strasberg, and is the winner of an Obie Award for Best Actress for two off-Broadway roles. Tonight’s monologue from Edward Albee’s play All Over concerns a woman’s relationship with the dying husband of another woman and reveals her other relationships, especially a teenage love affair. Rosina invites you to see her in Shadows by Av Inlender on Thursday, May 26, 2016 at 7PM at St Malachy’s Church, 239 West 49th Street, between Broadway and 8th Avenue. Performance is free.

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Marni Rice

Marni Rice, singer, musician, writer and producer performed two songs from the Sarah Makem songbook, “My Bonnie Boy” and “The Lowlands of Holland” plus an excerpt from her collection of poems  It’s Not The End of the World. Don’t miss the chance to see Marni perform her original text and music in Cabaret of the Absurd at Wow Café Theatre, 59 East 4th Street on June 10 and 11 at 8 pm. For more info please visit: http://www.dejouxmusique.com.

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Brendan Costello

IAW&A Board member and teacher of Creative Writing at the City College, Brendan Costello’s moving essay “Though Soft You Tread Above Me” memorializing his late father appeared recently in The Huffington Post. Tonight he read an excerpt from his novel-in-progress, Winning, set in the riverboat casino boom of the 1990s. In this segment, we meet a young man meditating on his impending professional success, ascending in his own estimation from “schlump to Trump.”  (And if that particular phrase becomes popular, we can credit Brendan.)

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John Paul Skocik

Another very versatile artist: musician, singer/songwriter, actor, playwright John Paul Skocik closed the night with two original, witty songs, “American Dream” and “Being Alone in New York City.

For complete updates on all members’ events and announcements, be sure to sign up for the IAW&A Weekly.To make sure you get all IAW&A news, and to tell us your news and announcements, to sign up to receive it, send an email to iawaweekly@gmail.com. 

IMPORTANT NOTE: Our next regularly-scheduled Salon will be on WEDNESDAY, June 1, starting at 7:00 pm at Bar Thalia.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Kathleen Walsh D’Arcy and Maureen Walsh Hossbacher used their considerable skills in organizing, writing, performing and connecting to co-host our mid-May IAW&A Salon at the Cell Theatre. The result, in the words of poet Connie Roberts “…a marvelous night…with a fabulous line-up.” That line-up had new musical talent, video, poetry, theater, fiction and fun.

 

The program opened with a scene from Dublin-born playwright Derek Murphy’s “Dyin’ For It,” a darkly funny work about “extremely inappropriate grieving by the dying Wally Kelly’s wife and daughter.” Superbly acted by Kimberly Kelly Adams, Anna Colson Nugent and Karin de la Penha, the scene was directed by Joe Handel.

 

Award winning poet from County Offaly and Hofstra University creative writing professor, Connie Roberts read from Little Witness, a collection of poetry inspired by her experiences growing up in an industrial school/orphanage in the Irish midlands. The poems included  “Oasis,” homage to her 85-year-old foster mother and “Little Witness,” a punch-packing six-line poem about child abuse. Connie’s “The ‘Boys’ in the Bunkhouse” was inspired by fellow IAW&A member Dan Barry’s 2014 investigative piece in The New York Times and now a book of the same title “about a few dozen men from Texas with intellectual disabilities who worked in servitude for decades in a turkey processing plant in Iowa.” “Inheritance” is about the 1943 Poor Clare orphanage fire in Cavan town, in which 35 girls and one old woman perished. The poem ends with the litany of their names, including “the 13 Marys.” Buried in eight coffins with no gravestone or memorial, the haunting verse finally gives them the commemoration they deserved. This summer Connie will receive the Exceptional Offaly Person of the Year 2016 Award at the Tullamore Show. https://connierobertspoet.com

 

David O’Leary, a young operatic tenor from County Wexford,

has sung for President Bill Clinton and for President of Ireland Mary McAleese and now he can add IAW&A to his resume. David trained with the Irish soprano Deirdre Masterson and has won prizes at major classical competitions in Dublin, Wicklow and Sligo. He has performed on many concert stages and venues in New York and Ireland. He charmed us at his first Salon with the Irish folk song “She Moved Through the Fair.”

 

Playwright, poet, and songwriter Gordon Gilbert has been presenting portions of his play Monologues from the Old Folks Home at earlier Salons. Tonight he read segments from three monologues and announced a full performance on Friday, June 24 at the Cornelia Street Café. Gordon regularly hosts spoken word events there, so plan to come out and support him.

http://www.corneliastreetcafe.com/restaurant.html

 

 

Kathleen O’Sullivan is creating a charming multi-media memoir Isham Street about growing up in the Inwood section of upper Manhattan. Tonight she showed a video introduction to that work, called “From Ireland to Isham Street” that introduces her family in their ancestral home in Rossdohan Island and describes her parents’ coming to America, settling in New York. They found, in the parks and rivers near Inwood, a place that reminded them a bit of Ireland.

 

Salon newcomer Leah Rankin studied classical cello performance at the Eastman School of Music and brilliantly combines classical music with trad tunes. One set used the opening phrase of a cello concerto and went into a jig called the “Silver Hand.” She also played the Scottish March “First Light,” a version of the reel “Killarney Boys of Pleasure” and “Catharsis” by Natalie MacMaster. Active on the NY trad scene, Leah runs an open session with Don Meade and Tom Dunne every Friday from 9 pm-12 am at the Long Hall pub 58 East 34th Street, near Park Avenue. Everyone is welcome.

 

A playwright, producer and songwriter and IAW&A Board member, Mark William Butler was thrilled to present Kaitlyn Baldwin and John Skocik, two great performers who sang Mark’s song, “I’ll Wear Myself,” from his musical comedy in development, Ugly Christmas Sweater, The Musical. You can see a concert reading on Monday, May 23rd at 5:30pm at the legendary cabaret theater Don’t Tell Mama on W. 46th Street.

http://www.donttellmamanyc.com/shows Adds Mark “It’s time to get ugly for Christmas!”

 

Rosina Fernhoff is an accomplished actor known for her solo performances at theatrical venues across the country, especially of works written by her late husband Av Inlender. She studied acting with Lee Strasberg, and is the winner of an Obie Award for Best Actress for two off-Broadway roles. Tonight’s monologue from Edward Albee’s play All Over concerns a woman’s relationship with the dying husband of another woman and reveals her other relationships, especially a teenage love affair. Rosina invites you to see her in Shadows by Av Inlender on Thursday, May 26, 2016 at 7PM at St Malachy’s Church, 239 West 49th Street, between Broadway and 8th Avenue. Performance is free.

 

Marni Rice, singer, musician, writer and producer performed two songs from the Sarah Makem songbook, “My Bonnie Boy” and “The Lowlands of Holland” plus an excerpt from her collection of poems

It’s Not The End of the World. Don’t miss the chance to see Marni perform her original text and music in Cabaret of the Absurd at Wow Café Theatre, 59 East 4th Street on June 10 and 11 at 8 pm. For more info please visit: http://www.dejouxmusique.com

 

 

IAW&A Board member and teacher of Creative Writing at the City College, Brendan Costello’s moving essay “Though Soft You Tread Above Me” memorializing his late father appeared recently in the Huffington Post. Tonight he read an excerpt from his novel-in-progress, Winning, set in the riverboat casino boom of the 1990s. In this segment, we meet a young man meditating on his impending professional success, ascending in his own estimation from “schlump to Trump.”  (And if that particular phrase becomes popular, we can credit Brendan.)

 

Another very versatile artist: musician, singer/songwriter, actor, playwright John Paul Skocik closed the night with two original, witty songs, “American Dream” and “Being Alone in New York City.”

 

 

 

 

For complete updates on all members’ events and announcements, be sure to sign up for the IAW&A Weekly.

To make sure you get all IAW&A news, and to tell us your news and announcements, to sign up to receive it, send an email to iawaweekly@gmail.com.

 

 

IMPORTANT NOTE: Our next regularly-scheduled Salon will be on Wednesday, June 1, starting at 7:00 pm at Bar Thalia.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

May 10, 2016

5.5.16 IAW&A Salon: Festive “Cinco de County Mayo” night with stories “meaningful and profound”

Filed under: Uncategorized — by kdaly321 @ 6:15 pm

By Karen Daly

Photos by Cat Dwyer

catseyepix-5115.jpg Sarah Fearon welcomes the crowd

Sarah Fearon warmed up the crowd with comedy on that special night she dubbed “Cinco de County Mayo.” Sarah produced and hosted an IAW&A Salon with a heartfelt vibe and amazing connections. Jon Gordon called the night “meaningful and profound.” We had several first time presenters, and unique offerings that included storytelling, poetry, memoir and photography.

Singer/songwriter Andrea Wright opened each half of the program with original songs from her two EP’s Riverside and Buoy Lights, both with autobiographical lyrics. An accomplished musician with a versatile voice, Andrea has performed worldwide. She studied piano at Interlochen Arts Academy and learned guitar from jazz and pop musicians in the city. http://www.andreawrightmusic.com

catseyepix-5123.jpgAndrea Wright

Writer, actress, comedienne and activist and new IAW&A member Marian Fontana read a wonderfully moving story about bringing her husband’s ashes to Ireland. Marion’s memoir is the widely praised A Widow’s Walk and her writing has appeared in The New Yorker, Vanity Fair, Salon.com and The Guardian. She is currently filming a web series and creating a one-woman show. Marianfontana.com

catseyepix-5132.jpgMarian Fontana

We welcomed Ira Goldstein, poet and family therapist, who read his work. Ira is also Marian’s dad.

catseyepix-5178.jpgIra Goldstein

Retired Police Captain Rita Mullaney served on the NYPD for 24 years. The Bay Ridge native crossed the bridge to walk a beat in Chelsea where she was drawn into the daily human drama. As she watched the neighborhood changing, she started to document the stories of the older residents through photography and video. Tonight Rita showed several photographs and told the stories behind them, revealing her compassion along with her skill.

catseyepix-5143.jpgRita Mullaney

Jazz saxophonist Jon Gordon entertained with stories from his work-in-progress, Jazz Lives. Jon was just starting out but found himself travelling and partying with legends Cab Calloway and Doc Cheatham. In a sweet, revealing anecdote, Jon told how he helped an 83 year-old woman fulfill her dream of playing “Amazing Grace.”
catseyepix-5165.jpgJon Gordon

Jim Rodgers read an excerpt from his novel, Long Night’s End.  Johnny Gunn, grieving over the tragic loss of his son, and recently his friend Jimmy, is back doing weekend gigs with his over-the-hill rock band.  Tonight they play in Sunnyside, Queens before a raucous crowd, where Johnny spots the voluptuous Molly Farrell, a woman destined to own his soul. Tonight he refuses to avoid her gaze and later, when the gig ends, he finds himself with Molly in an emotional hurricane, one which draws both of them toward her apartment and the inevitable sin he’s been avoiding.

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Sean Hickey shared three original poems, including “Requiem for a Crow,” an account of what he describes as “the genuinely moving mourning I witnessed one crow doing over the fallen body of another.”

catseyepix-5203.jpgSean Hickey

Sean announced the third annual Bergen County Irish Festival on Saturday, June 25th, at Overpeck County Park in Ridgefield Park, New Jersey from 9:00 am – 7:00 pm. The festival’s Literature Tent will be open from 1:00 pm – 4:00 pm.

Sign up: IAW&A members are invited to sign up to read or perform at the Bergen County Irish Festival. You may have a 10-minute slot to present your work, or a 15-minute slot to present your work and that of a favorite Irish or Irish-American author or artist. Readings and performances should relate to Ireland or the Irish/Irish-American experience, and they should be suitable for a general audience. Presenters will be able to display and sell books, CDs, and other works in the tent. If you are interested in presenting at the festival, please contact Sean Hickey at sean.hickey2@gmail.com.

Inspired by the commemorative events of the 1916 Easter Rising, Guen Donohue wondered what events would mark each day an Irish leader of the Rising was executed. Finding none, Guen decided to hold her own Impromptu Memorials at The Irish Hunger Memorial. Those early mornings found Guen singing to the stones of Ireland in Irish, and speaking about the men who died. For us, she sang Patrick Pearse’s words, Mise Éire, set to music by Patrick Cassidy.

catseyepix-5209.jpgGuen Donohue

Tom Mahon’s vignettes often have a dramatic, twisting end.  “The Bridge Tender’s Wife” tells of a woman whose husband sees her on a sailboat with four men.  That night he tricks her into confirming that she had sex with three men. It was the second time he had married her, and the last.

catseyepix-5211.jpgTom Mahon

Pat Lavin read a moving personal essay about her daughter and her daughter’s fiancé.

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Malachy McCourt traditionally closes the Salon at Bar Thalia, and he remarked on what a special night we had. Of course, he had a few remarks about politics and history and ended with a Famine Song.

Oh, the praties they grow small over here, over here

Oh, the praties they grow small, and we dig them in the fall

And we eat them, skin and all, over here, over here, over here.

catseyepix-5225.jpgMalachy McCourt,  “Sing the song, children!”

See you next time, Tuesday, May 17, The Cell.

 

 

 

 

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