Irish American Writers & Artists

October 26, 2012

“Fireworks” at Salon at the Cell

“The whole night was like fireworks,” playwright Janet Noble said of Tuesday night’s IAW&A’s Salon at The Cell.  The perfect blend of presentations and talents made for an electric evening. There were two singers, three one-person acts that included music, two films, a scene from a play and four writers reading their works. It would be hard to pick the evening’s highlight but Janet’s play,  Hello, Mr. Chops, was certainly a candidate.  The one act play was given an hilarious reading by, as Janet calls them, “two gorgeous actors,” Mary Tierney and Jack O’Connell. It was brilliant and as Janet added, “Completely unrehearsed.” Bravo!
Mary Tierney and Jack O’Connell
Singer/songwriter Tara O’Grady opened the evening performing a melancholic tune called, “An Cuileann Sul Glas” (The Green Eyed Girl). Tara was recently introduced to her ninety-five year old cousin, Packie Moore, the author of thousands of tunes and stories, and her lyrics tell the story of his secret…marrying a Protestant girl in England. Eventually Packie was faced with a harsh dilemma: Which funeral does he attend when his wife and his father die on the same day?  “This but begins the woe, a modern Irish Romeo. Deny thy father, oh he could not.” The songwriting skills are obviously in the blood.
Charles R. Hale presented a film created by Lucy Mathews Heegaard and Charles called Judy Collins: A Life in Music and Video, which  which was debuted at the Eugene O’Neill Lifetime Achievement Award event last week. I told of my “creative process,” how I likened my work to a four movement classical symphony and how the “movement” of the images in the last section of the video called “Peace” were inspired by the fourth movement of Beethoven’s Third Symphony., Charles noted that mentioning Beethoven and him in the same breath might be a stretch, so, as he said, “Go ahead, sue me.” 
Guenevere Donohue
Guen Donohue once again combined her acting, singing and writing talents in a performance from her stage piece, Killer is my Name. Beginning with a haunting Irish funeral dirge known as keening, she then stood on a table and improvised her father’s time spent walking the beams while building the WTC.  As she balanced “on the beam” she told of her father’s lost friends who “took the fall” as well as those who inhaled the asbestos, pronouncing that the buildings had taken lives before it had even been built. Her finale was an original song, “Revered,” yet another haunting vocal performance, weaving together the grandness and melancholy of the WTC experience in the Sean Nos tradition. Poignant, beautiful, cathartic.
Brendan Connellan jumped up and told a fast paced tale of unhealthy addiction, frantic flirtation, tottering self regard, Burgerking bags of cash  and sorry and abrupt endings, taken from his Wall Street dark comic novel-in-progress, Trading Ninja
Cathy Maguire
First time presenter, Cathy Maguire, brought her guitar and sang two beautiful tunes. One, “Portrait” is also the title tune of her recently released CD and tells the story of the songwriter looking at a very old and worn wedding photo and wondering how their lives turned out. It was a great treat hearing this talented singer who was warmly received by salon crowd. 
Kevin R.McPartland began the second half of the evening reading a short passage from his soon to be released novel Brownstone Dreams. Kevin describes the protagonist Bobby Dutton’s sad reflections at his grandfather’ s wake. Kevin also announced a slight delay in the release of his book by Boann Books & Media due to a glitch in the book jacket design and a final edit. Kevin is now anticipating a launch in the early spring.
Seamus Scanlon read from his highly regarded new collection As Close As You’ll Ever Be.  There wasn’t a dry eye in the house! The book is available on Amazon, Barnes & Noble, Mysterious Bookshop, Centre for Fiction, City College Bookstore and direct from Seamus (seamus.scanlon@gmail.com).
Malachy McCourt rounded out this dynamic evening with a few fine words and a stirring rendition of “Go, Lassie Go.” A perfect ending to the perfect event.
For more on the Irish American Writers and Artists or their salons, contact Charles R. Halechashale1@yahoo.com  Salons are normally the first and third Tuesday of each month; however, the next salon will be on the second Tuesday of the month, Nov. 13, 7PM at the Thalia Cafe at 95th and Broadway. 
Photos by Cathleen “Cat” Dwyer

Mary Deady, the Irish Lark, Back on Stage at the West Bank Cafe

Filed under: Music,Theater — by johnleemedia @ 1:01 am
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Singer Mary Deady returns to the West Bank Cafe on Tues., Oct. 30 at 7 pm to take her audience on another musical journey from Ireland to New York through the American Songbook  – songs by Burton Lane, Cole Porter, Alan Jay Lerner, Sondheim, and more.   Her last appearance there drew rave reviews; we recap one of them below.

Mary Deady’s American Songbook at the West Bank Cafe

By Cahir O’Doherty, Posted in IrishCentral.com on Wednesday, August 15, 2012 at 07:39 AM

Mary Deady

Some singers are so good you can literally hear how much a song means to them as they perform it. It doesn’t happen very often, but it did last week at the West Bank Cafe on 42nd Street as Irish singer Mary Deady unveiled her latest musical journey at the Broadway hotspot.

A familiar face on the Irish scene in the city, it felt as though we were being collectively re-introduced to her since she is perhaps best known for singing Irish music. For many, including myself, this was our first introduction to her as a singer of the American songbook.

Aided by the utterly flawless musicianship of pianist and musical director Jeff Cubeta, Deady’s show From Ireland to America: A Musical Journey In Song was a marvel from the opening number.

It was Deady’s good fortune to be born in Co. Kerry, holy ground for generations of world-class singers and musicians. There she learned to play the harp, and later she left for Dublin for classically trained singing lessons that would eventually take her far from home on the musical journey that was her own life.

Deady chose songs that conveyed the immigrant love (and sometimes secret pining for) the homeland, and this she did as well as I have ever had the good fortune to hear. But the show has wider ambitions than merely relying on all too easy sentiment. Deady has a compelling tale to tell, and that is part of what takes this performance to the next level.

What I did not anticipate was being so moved by the deep connections between her life and the music that she took ownership of, each time from the first note.

Deady also sang songs in praise of the fairly demonic energy of New York City itself, and her version of the 1930 Cole Porter classic I Happen to Like New York seemed to conjure the whole damn city in a tribute that delighted the hard bitten New Yorkers in her audience. Believe me, that takes some skill…

To read the rest of this post, please go HERE

Mary Deady
The Irish Lark

From Ireland to America: A Musical Journey in Song
traces Mary’s origins from a small village in County Kerry,
to traveling the world,
finding in time a home in New York City.
Although Mary is known for singing Irish music,
she has yearned to sing from the American Songbook
– from Porter to Sondheim –
where the heart and soul of this journey unfolds.
Mary is accompanied by Jeff Cubeta, Musical Director.
West Bank Cafe, The Laurie Beechman Theatre,
407 West 42nd
Street & 9th
Avenue
October 30th at 7:00 pm
$15 cover
$15 food/beverage minimum
Call 212-695-6909 to reserve

October 23, 2012

IAW&A New Jersey Salon Returns Thursday

Filed under: Events,Literature,Theater,Visual Arts — by johnleemedia @ 10:02 am
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IAW&A New Jersey Salon…Thurs., Oct 25 at 7 PM
Appearing at the Irish American Writers & Artists’ New Jersey Salon in Morristown, NJ is “Highway Star” Billy Barrett.
Billy is part of the rising tide of new age neo-beat authors.

One writer said, “His prose has the effect of Dylan Thomas crossing paths with the lyrics of the first three Springsteen albums.”

His readings from his novel in progress, “Highway Star” are original and provocative.
Meet Billy and others at 7 PM at the Irish American Cultural Institute, just steps away from the NJ Transit Morristown stop at 1 Lackawanna Place.
For more info, contact Mike Farragher at irishwriter@optonline.net

 

October 20, 2012

Salon schedule updates…

Filed under: Uncategorized — by johnleemedia @ 2:37 pm

A reminder: This Tuesday, October 23, there will be a Salon at The Cell, 228 West 23rd Street at 7PM.

Normally, there would be a salon on the first Tuesday in November, but since this is election night that date will be changed. More info

on that to follow.

Also, this Thursday, October 25, Mike Farragher will be hosting the second Irish American Writers & Artists’ NJ Salon in Morristown, NJ. For more info click here:https://www.facebook.com/events/452476801465748/

October 19, 2012

Judy Collins’s O’Neill Award Celebration Reunites Folk Legends and Inspires Artists

by John Kearns

“I have always believed that, in my heart, I am first and foremost a storyteller descended from a long line of Irish storytellers and balladeers.”   Judy Collins

Eugene O’Neill Award, crafted by Tiffany & Co.

On Monday, October 15, 2012, in the middle of the one of the year’s great celebrations, the The Irish American Writers & Artists Eugene O’Neill Lifetime Achievement Awards Celebration, 93-year-old folksinger, songwriter, and fighter for civil rights, peace, and the environment, Pete Seeger, stood strumming his enduring banjo before a hushed audience of over 200.

“If the world is still around in another 100 years,” he declared, “it will be because of the arts.”

 

And the large crowd in attendance at the Eugene O’Neill Lifetime Achievement Award at the Manhattan Club above Rosie O’Grady’s on a rainy Monday night was testament to the truth of Seeger’s declaration.  The crowd, representing all genres of the arts, had gathered to celebrate Judy Collins’s lifetime of artistic achievement and to show its commitment to further such achievement.  The spirit of inspiration, encouragement, generosity, and cross-pollination was abundant in the friendly atmosphere of the Manhattan Club.  Indeed, Judy Collins’s long-time friend on the folk music scene, Tom Paxton, was on hand to honor her, as was Pete Seeger.  Even the City of New York showed its support for the arts: City Council Speaker Christine Quinn issued a special proclamation in honor of the event.

 

In keeping with the musical theme of the evening, Black ’47 bandleader, author, and playwright, Larry Kirwan, acted as Master of Ceremonies.  Larry got the ceremony started by introducing IAW&A President, T.J. English.

TJ English

 

T.J. who has taken over the presidency from Peter Quinn, apologized for not being as eloquent as his speech-writer predecessor.

 

“While Peter was writing about ‘a shining city on a hill’ for Mario Cuomo, I was saying, ‘Get the fuck out of my cab.’”

 

Past President Peter Quinn & Current President TJ English

TJ updated the audience on some of the progress made by the IAW&A over the past year, in particular the burgeoning success of the semimonthly Salons at the Café Thalia and the Cell Theatre.  These evenings have become so popular that IAW&A is preparing a third monthly gathering of artists to share their work with one another.

 

T.J. also talked about the mission of the IAW&A and of the Eugene O’Neill Lifetime Achievement Award.  The Eugene O’Neill Lifetime Achievement Award was established in 2009 to honor the accomplishments of a writer, actor, musician, or cultural institution that has sustained a body of work that best exemplifies the level of integrity maintained by O’Neill.  O’Neill Awards have been presented to Pulitzer-prize winning author William Kennedy, actor Brian Dennehy, and Charlotte Moore and Ciarán O’Reilly of New York’s Irish Repertory Theatre.  Judy Collins is the first musician to receive the award.

 

However, the IAW&A president added, there is another purpose of the award that might not be found in its official description.  By recognizing an individual such as Judy Collins who, with her 38 albums and five books, has spent a lifetime as an artist, the Eugene O’Neill Lifetime Achievement Award can inspire others to forge a career in the arts, a career for which “there are no entry-level positions and there is no blueprint.”

 

Larry Kirwan next introduced Tom Moran, Chief Executive Officer and President of Mutual of America Life Insurance.  Tom began by saying, like T.J., he had been a New York City cab driver.  But, unlike T.J., before chasing customers out of the cab, “I always made sure to get the tip.”

 

Tom Moran

Tom Moran said that he has no talent himself but he does have the ability to listen — not only with his ears but with his heart.  Listening with both ears and heart, Moran explained, was necessary to appreciate the beautiful voice and the soulful emotion in the music of Judy Collins.  He also praised Judy Collins’s work for Concern Worldwide, the Irish charity of which he is chairman.

 

Introducing IAW&A Co-Director Charles Hale, Larry Kirwan attributed much of the success of the Salons to the welcoming atmosphere created by Charles whom, Larry recognized for being particularly good at encouraging first-time presenters.  Charles introduced and showed the original short film he created with Lucy Matthews Heegaard about the life and music of Judy Collins, “Walls: We Are Not Forgotten.” Watch the video.

 

The film, featuring the Judy Collins’s voiceover taken from Charles’s interview with the folksinging legend, takes us through Collins’s life from childhood to the present, focusing on her mother and father, her son, her music, and her work for peace.  The soundtrack on the film features the soaring song “Walls: We Are Not Forgotten” composed and sung by Collins with lyrics from a poem by her husband, Korean-War-Memorial designer, Louis Nelson.

 

“Everyone at their heart is in some ways Irish, I’m convinced,” Collins says in the film, “because there’s a piece of all of us that has this deeply wounded place that needs to be healed by music.  The Irish do that all the time.”

 

Before bringing Peter Seeger to the stage, Larry Kirwan told the story of how he first met the indomitable folksinger in the ’70s, when Seeger was beginning his campaign to clean up the polluted Hudson River.  Larry recalled playing some concerts near Seeger’s hometown, which did not always have the most receptive audiences.  As a young man newly arrived from Ireland, Larry marveled at Seeger’s determination to change things and his confidence that his effort would succeed.  Seeger’s career, Larry stated, reminds him of the words of Bobby Sands, “Everyone … has their own particular part to play. No part is too great or too small; no one is too old or too young to do something.”

 

Pete Seeger did not make a speech.

Pete Seeger

Instead, he strummed his banjo and softly sang, “Quite Early Morning,” about the power of song to inspire the next generation to sing and play and to fight for justice.   Seeger’s voice is not as strong as it once was, but his spirit certainly is, and he had a full house willing to join in with him.

 

“And so keep on while we live

Until we have no, no more to give

And when these fingers can strum no longer

Hand the old banjo to young ones stronger … ”

 

I don’t know of any “young ones stronger” who can take up Pete Seeger’s banjo when he finally grows too tired to play.  But, perhaps the song did inspire some younger artists listening, as T.J. English suggested the Eugene O’Neill Award has the power to do, and as Peter Seeger has done for decades.

 

“I know that you who hear my singing

Could make those freedom bells go ringing.”

 

Seeger exhorted us to keep the song going.  With considerable gusto, the 93-year-old urged us to sing it, “One more time!”

 

Growing up in Wexford, Ireland, Larry Kirwan said he wanted to play the guitar like Jimi Hendrix.  Then one day, he turned on Radio Telefis Eireann (RTE), the only channel available on his black-and-white TV at the time, and saw a man alone on stage playing a quiet acoustic guitar and singing.  The singer, Tom Paxton, revealed to Larry a new type of communication between artist and audience and Larry realized that music did not have to be “blasted out” to be effective.  After this story, Larry got the crowd to sing a few bars from Tom Paxton’s “The Last Thing on My Mind.”

 

Tom Paxton took to the stage with his guitar, and he did sing “The Last Thing on My Mind.”  However, he first sang a song about falling in love simultaneously with a woman and with Ireland.

Tom Paxton

 

Finishing the tune, he quipped, “Never let it be said that I don’t know how to pander to an audience.”

 

When Paxton did perform “The Last Thing on My Mind,” a song beautifully recorded by Judy Collins, the Manhattan Club crowd sang along with him.

 

Using a slang term, he picked up in Ireland and the U.K., Paxton paid Judy Collins the tribute of dubbing her a true “muso,” or a “lifer” dedicated to the creation and performing of music.

 

Next up was the man that Larry described as needing no introduction, IAW&A Co-Director, Malachy McCourt. In presenting Judy Collins with her Eugene O’Neill Lifetime Achievement Award, created and donated by Tiffany & Co., Malachy thanked Judy Collins for being a true friend and a treasure throughout the many years that he has known her.  He jokingly wished that she would become a Mormon so that she could welcome him as a second husband.

Judy Collins happily accepted the award and thanked and hugged Malachy and Larry.  She spoke of how happy she was to have her name associated with the great Eugene O’Neill and agreed with Pete Seeger’s assertion that whatever future we will have will be because of the arts.  Interspersing bits of a cappella singing, Collins told amusing tales about her career and about how she met her husband.

 

Emcee Larry Kirwan & Honoree Judy Collins

To wrap up the ceremony, Co-Director Ashley Davis gathered Pete Seeger, Tom Paxton, and Judy Collins on stage to sing, “Will You Go Lassie, Go?”  The audience, of course, was very willing to help out.

 

Then it was back to the socializing at the open bar with generous hors d’œuvre that kept coming and coming.  Novelists, musicians, poets, actors, filmmakers, photographers, illustrators, and artists of all stripes made and renewed connections well past the party’s official closing time.  Here’s hoping that they also renewed their commitment to keep the music going, until their “fingers can strum no longer.”

Congratulations to Judy Collins on her Eugene O’Neill Lifetime Achievement Award!  Judy Collins believes she is from a long line of storytellers and balladeers.  A line that’s still being drawn …

And a special thanks to all our patrons, advertisers, supporters, volunteers, presenters and to the great crew at Rosie’ O’Grady’s Manhattan Club for making this event such a success!

An Evening with the First Eugene O’Neill Award Winner William Kennedy…

Filed under: Events,Literature,Theater — by johnleemedia @ 12:34 am
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…Moderated by the first IAW&A president Peter Quinn
presented by the Irish Arts Center in association with Irish American Writers and Artists

Tuesday, October 30th | 7:30 pm

“Kennedy, master of the Irish-American lament in works like Billy Phelan’s Greatest Game and Ironweed, proves here he can play with both hands and improvise on a theme without losing the beat.” -THE NEW YORK TIMES BOOK REVIEW

Celebrate with us the paperback launch of Changó’s Beads and TwoTone Shoes. Kennedy will be joined in conversation by author Peter Quinn.

Changó’s Beads and TwoTone Shoes is a an unforgettably riotous story of revolution, romance, and redemption, set against the landscape of the civil rights movement as it challenges the legendary and vengeful Albany political machine. Journalist Daniel Quinn’s epic journey carries him through the nightclubs and jungles of Cuba and into the newsrooms and racially charged streets of Albany on the day Robert Kennedy is fatally shot in 1968. The odyssey brings Quinn, and his exotic but unpredictable Cuban wife, Renata, a debutante revolutionary, face-to-face with the darkest facets of human nature and illuminates the power of love in the presence of death.

Reserve your free admission HERE

October 15, 2012

LAST CALL for Eugene O’Neill Award honoring JUDY COLLINS

Filed under: Events,Literature,Music,Social Activism — by johnleemedia @ 2:07 am
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A trio of folk music legends will reunite at next Monday’s annual Eugene O’Neill Lifetime Achievement Award Celebration as one of the founding fathers of American folk music, Pete Seeger, has just confirmed that he will join another folk legend, Tom Paxton, on the program honoring singer-songwriter Judy Collins.
The Eugene O’Neill Award is given annually by Irish American Writers & Artists, Inc. to a writer, actor, musician, painter or other type of artist who has created a body of work that places them among the great artists and entertainers of all time.
“There is no one in the history of the folk music movement who casts a bigger shadow than Pete Seeger,” said IAW&A president and best-selling author T.J. English. “As a song writer, singer, and activist for human rights for more than 50 years, Seeger is a legend, and his desire to honor Judy Collins at the Eugene O’Neill Lifetime Achievement Award event will make this a night of significant historical importance.”
Celtic rock legend Larry Kirwan will emcee a program that will include writer-director John Patrick Shanley (winner of the artist’s trifecta – an Oscar, Tony and Pulitzer Prize); actor-author Malachy McCourt; Celtic songstress Ashley Davis; and a video tribute by Charles Hale to highlight a festive evening of “Literary Libations.”
The award, created by Tiffany & Co., will be presented Mon., Oct. 15, 2012 at a celebration starting at 6:00 PM at the Manhattan Club above Rosie O’Grady’s in Times Square, just a few blocks from where Eugene O’Neill was born. Ticketing information is on the IAW&A website.

October 12, 2012

IRISH AMERICAN WRITERS & ARTISTS’ SALON AT THE THALIA CAFE, 10/9/12

Filed under: Literature,Theater — by johnleemedia @ 1:02 pm
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By 

Guenevere Donohue began Tuesday night’s IAW&A salon at the Thalia Café with a dose of history and a shot of soul…Irish style. Singing the Sean Nos, “An Raibh Tú ag an gCarraig?” (Were you at the rock?) Guen spoke of the love songs use as a “code song” during the days when Ireland’s invaders suppressed the practice of religion.   Guen followed her explanation with a stirring rendition of this powerful song. Great way to open the evening.

Honor Molloy

It’s the playoff season, which means Yankee baseball here in New York City (until tonight at least) and in keeping with the spirit of the season, Jim Rodgers read a baseball memoir about an underdog little league team of forty years ago, a squeeze play seemingly gone wrong, and a teammate trying to get over the loss of his mother. With the townspeople in the stands, the field illuminated by lights acquired from the dismantled Polo Grounds, and the bewitching hour of 1o PM approaching, the crowd and the players awaited the return of the ball as the errant bunt hung in the night sky and then began it’s fall to the diamond and an almost sure out. Only Jim, and those who attended the reading at the Thalia know the outcome of that rogue bunt. As Jim said, “Another reason to join us for our readings at the Salon!” True.

Tom Mahon read the second half of a short story that took place in Bayonne, NJ in the 50′s. The story’s about a kid, a wise guy, who loves imitating the old, Italian shoemaker for his pals—is imitation the greatest form of flattery?—and who soon  finds himself working with the old man, delivering the shoes customers forget to pick up. When Tony is hit by a car and killed, the kid is devastated.  He discovers he loved the old man, and he isn’t consoled knowing his friend is in heaven. A well-read, well-written story on the loss of life and innocence, and the pain of living as an adult.

 

Shelia Walsh

Four salon “regulars” followed: IAW&A Treasurer John Kearns read a new episode from his novel in progress, Worlds, about four generations of the Logan family. In this episode, set in 1950′s Philadelphia, Janey Dougherty is having an affair with the head of the Logan Construction Company. When James disappears on a business trip without warning, Janey struggles with the loss and with the temptation to board a train to join him.  Playwright/screenwriter Sheila Walsh, with the assistance of Kevin McPartland, read the beginning of Sheila’s screenplay, Gateway.  In the early 1960′s, Nora Quinn drops out of college to live with her boyfriend Louie, a racetrack hustler.  It’ll be enjoyable watching this story of first love, loss of innocence and loss of  soul unfold. And what would be a salon be without the brilliant Honor Molloy, always a salon favorite. Honor read—that word doesn’t do Honor justice—or rather performed Backassed, a memoir of NYC in the early 80s.Bestselling author Jeanine Cummins followed Honor and read from her new novel, The Crooked Branch, which comes out in March.  After she read a particularly vivid excerpt about childbirth, one man in the audience introduced himself to herthis way, “Hello, I was just pregnant with you.”

Sarah Fearon

And then, from the throes of childbirth to the lighter side of life, beginning with Sarah Fearon riffing on a wide range of subjects. Putting a humorous spin on subjects from researching our roots, the economy, yoga, relationships, hoarding, real estate, and introducing the idea of the “Smart Clone,” Sarah had the crowd roaring. And if that weren’t enough, she was followed by “Malachy time.”  Malachy McCourt that is.  And picking up where Sarah left off, Malachy read a hilarious essay from a recently published anthology entitled Exit Laughing.  Malachy sent everyone into the break laughing (no one exited, though) riffing on the funny side of death and plane flights with “Angela’s Ashes,” a reference to his beloved mother and his brother’s book of the same name.  No shortage of material in this family.

Kathleen Vaughan closed out the readings sharing a chapter from her upcoming book The Fatal Call.  Cancer was a transformational experience, Kate says. “I am grateful that I had the wake up call and grateful for all the awakening I have done because I had this illness. Anything is possible when you align with your spirit.”  Bravo, Kate.t

Charles Hale and Malachy McCourt

And the evening ended on a high note, in fact, a number of beautiful high notes. Combining Billie Holiday’s gift for meticulous but effortlessly poetic phrasing with Anita O’Day’s swingin’ sassiness, June Christy’s cocktail coolness, Patsy Cline’s rural romanticism, and Sarah Vaughn’s sophisticated sultriness, New York jazz/blues singer Tara O’Grady is indeed a musical force of nature to reckon with.  Sarah sang her rendition of Billie Holiday’s 1957 recording of “Stars Fell on Alabama,” a song she is currently translating into Irish, along with other jazz standards. Brilliant ending to a grand evening.

And this note from Philomena Forde. “Thanks for a great night of fun and fellowship. I felt good reading my piece as it brought back many happy memories, and contained a few historical bits and pieces also.  The variety of comedy—Sara was great—playwriting, short stories, and of course Malachy’s wonderful presentation was just fantastic.  That’s Limerick for ye!” And that about says it all.

The next salon will be at The Cell Theatre located at 338 W 23rd St, on Thursday, October 23 at 7PM. For more info on the salons contact Charles R. Hale at chashale1@yahoo.com 

October 9, 2012

IAW&A Member is Reading At Dramatists Guild Friday

Filed under: Literature,Theater — by johnleemedia @ 11:49 am

A reading of IAW&A member Mark Donnelly’s complete play about Mother Jones will be held at the Dramatists Guild in Manhattan on Friday, October 12 at 7:30. The Dramatists Guild is located at 1501 Broadway between W. 43rd

and W. 44th Sts. The reading will take place in the Frederick Loewe Room on the 7th Floor.
Free. No reservations. First come, first seated by a DG staff person. (45 seat capacity, not including the 9 readers who will be on stools at the front of the room.) Please stay outside the building until 7:20. We will be let in at that time. (There is a previous reading at 6 p.m.)
Mother Jones was an Irish immigrant who played a prominent role as a union organizer in the American Labor Movement in the late 19th and early 20th Centuries.

October 8, 2012

Folk Music Founding Father PETE SEEGER Joins TOM PAXTON to Honor JUDY COLLINS

Wasn’t That a Time! Tom Paxton & Pete Seeger, back together to honor Judy Collins

Pete Seeger Joins Tom Paxton on Eugene O’Neill Award Line-up

Folk Legends and Irish American Notables Gather to honor JUDY COLLINS in NYC on Mon. Oct 15, 2012
 
A trio of folk music legends will reunite at next Monday’s annual Eugene O’Neill Lifetime Achievement Award Celebration as one of the founding fathers of American folk music, Pete Seeger, has just confirmed that he will join another folk legend, Tom Paxton, on the program honoring singer-songwriter Judy Collins.
 
The Eugene O’Neill Award is given annually by Irish American Writers & Artists, Inc. to a writer, actor, musician, painter or other type of artist who has created a body of work that places them among the great artists and entertainers of all time.
 
“There is no one in the history of the folk music movement who casts a bigger shadow than Pete Seeger,” said IAW&A president and best-selling author T.J. English. “As a song writer, singer, and activist for human rights for more than 50 years, Seeger is a legend, and his desire to honor Judy Collins at the Eugene O’Neill Lifetime Achievement Award event will make this a night of significant historical importance.”
 
Celtic rock legend Larry Kirwan will emcee a program that will include writer-director John Patrick Shanley (winner of the artist’s trifecta – an Oscar, Tony and Pulitzer Prize); actor-author Malachy McCourt; Celtic songstress Ashley Davis; and a video tribute by Charles Hale to highlight a festive evening of “Literary Libations.”
 
The award, created by Tiffany & Co., will be presented Mon., Oct. 15, 2012 at a celebration starting at 6:00 PM at the Manhattan Club above Rosie O’Grady’s in Times Square, just a few blocks from where Eugene O’Neill was born. Ticketing information is on theIAW&A website.
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